Call for papers vol 9, no. 1, 2018 is open until 30 March 2018

GLOBALISATION AND INDIAN CIVIL-MILITARY RELATIONS A NEW HOPE - AT INDIA PAKISTAN BORDER A Culture of Peace Process in Kashmir (A Case Study of a School Near LOC)

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By
PROFESSOR Leena PARMAR
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INTRODUCTION
The conventional notion of security has been and remains State-centric with military
as its major instrument, entrusted with the duty to defend the territorial integrity of the
nation-state. No doubt, safeguarding territorial integrity from external aggression is most
vital for the honorable existence of any nation-state. However there are equally, if not more
vital concerns and facets of security, that are often, ignored in the specialized security
discourse of military strategists-, where the concerned area is ravaged by militancy, hatred
and innocent killings. Military security through armed and ammunitions with latest
equipment’s often neglects the social structures, people’s movements, and non-state actors,
thus making the entire process elitist, parochial and often insensitive.
The changing nature of Civil-Military Relations in Asia has been focus for any serious
scholar of peace and security. This current research is on the Civil Military Relations, an
Army – Corporate world initiative. This is aimed at bringing peace to the people of the
Kashmir Valley.
In any discussion on national security, it would be useful to keep in mind the physical
parameters of our concerns. In this context it would be worthwhile to recount a few facts
which though otherwise well known are not adequately kept in view. India is the seventh
largest country in the world. It has an area of about 3.3 million sq. kms land boundaries of
15,200 km, over 600 island territories, a coastline of over 7,500 km and an Exclusive
Economic Zone (EEZ) of 2.5 million sq. km. We have land frontiers with six countries and
maritime borders with five countries. Our island territories in the east, 1,300 km away from
the mainland, are far closer to our Association for South East Asian Nation (ASEAN)
neighbors. Except Haryana and Madhya Pradesh, all other states and some of the Union
territories have one or more land or maritime borders which require to be safeguarded. Our
borders with Pakistan and China are militarized; those with Pakistan generate a variety of
threats to our country. While speaking about India’s security concerns, it is also necessary
to remember that our country represents an immense cultural and geographical diversity
and socio-religious traditions, which go back to 5,000 years of recorded history. Every



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